it's the clichés that cause the trouble

Apr 24

cnnxt:

"This is one of the most important questions I ask myself. With every invite, opportunity and request — is this a place where I will expand or will I have to shrink to make this work? And when that body-caving-in shrinking happens (rather than heart-opening expansion), I ask: how might I step into a place of expansion? Nearly all of my decisions stem from this place. Game-changing is an understatement. Day 49 of 100. #the100daybook #the100dayproject"

cnnxt:

"This is one of the most important questions I ask myself. With every invite, opportunity and request — is this a place where I will expand or will I have to shrink to make this work? And when that body-caving-in shrinking happens (rather than heart-opening expansion), I ask: how might I step into a place of expansion? Nearly all of my decisions stem from this place. Game-changing is an understatement. Day 49 of 100. #the100daybook #the100dayproject"


Apr 19

digbicks:

Tiny Tattoos, Austin Tott

American photographer Austin Tott has captured a series of images that match miniature, hand-drawn body art to backgrounds from which they draw visual reference. Tiny tattoos are outlined onto the surface of a wrist, penned on the skin in black ink.

Illustrating small-scale bicycles, little trees and envelopes onto the arm, Tott then holds up the hand amongst various landscapes, sets and scenes, which thematically parallel each drawing. 

(via tomorrowed)


Apr 10
migas:

I was doing wheel on a beach trip with my family and my grandpa climbed through :) 
http://aubreyavocado.tumblr.com/

migas:

I was doing wheel on a beach trip with my family and my grandpa climbed through :) 

http://aubreyavocado.tumblr.com/



“While Hardee’s told us recently that you have to literally become a man to enjoy a burger, Veet’s new ad campaign warns us that women will literally become men without their wax strips. And, again, that isn’t what the ads imply – which obviously wouldn’t be all that rare for a body hair removal product. The campaign’s tagline is “Don’t risk dudeness!” and features a few different videos showing women whose one-day-old stumble has turned them into men being shamed by a paramedic, taxi driver, and even a professional salon worker. Yep, just one day will do it, ladies! The whole thing is vaguely transphobic, relying on the idea that “dudeness” is determined by body hair and that there’s something inherently funny about a man in a dress. And the ad featuring a disgusted boyfriend above throws in some homophobia — “Eww, two guys in bed together, gross!” – for good measure.

Of course, the irony of Veet’s campaign is that the very existence of its product undermines the idea that there is anything naturally “womanly” about a hairless body. Most men and women have some body hair. (If this is news to you, I hope you are someday blessed with the chance to see the range of bodies that exist outside the fantasy world of porn.) The cultural norm that leads many women to remove that hair, while men typically do not, is pretty much arbitrary — and one that necessitates some artificial intervention by razor, cream, laser, or, say, Veet’s wax strips.”
Having body hair will literally turn you into a dude, according to Veet’s new ad campaign (via brutereason)

(via samanticshift)


Killian Jones - “It’s Not Easy Being Green”

(via samanticshift)


Apr 9

“I take great care of myself by carefully shutting myself away.” Vincent van Gogh, Letter from Vincent van Gogh to Theo van Gogh (via walkdontfly)

(via sassykidney)


Apr 7

This is the rape joke:
My best friend was four years old the first time his father came into his room at midnight and tore out his throat. He still has days when I cannot hold him because the memory of a bleeding trachea haunts his doorway. He has not been home for the holidays in many years, but – even now – hands are seen as weapons.

This is the rape joke:
I have been told by more than twenty people that they have been raped. To all of them, I asked where the rapist was. From none of them, I heard ‘jail.’

This is the rape joke:
Once my brother told me that I was so ugly, I would be a virgin forever. Unless someone raped me. But even they wouldn’t come back for seconds.

This is the rape joke:
I believed him.

This is the rape joke:
I now look at every woman on the street and wonder if the space between her legs is a crime scene, surrounded by ripped caution tape. The statistics tell me that this is so common that I will never be in a room that does not contain a survivor. Not even if I am in that room alone.

This is the rape joke:
I was thirteen years old, and he was supposed to be just a friend.

This is the rape joke:
When his older brother came home, the boy pulled away. He wiped the tears from my face and said ‘we should do this again some time.’

This is the rape joke:
When I finally told my parents, they asked what I had been wearing.

This is the rape joke:
I had been wearing my innocence. My trust. I had worn the love I held for humanity and expected to be treated well. I had never been taught that I would be that girl, the one who keeps a mine of secrets between her legs – that girl was the slut. I wasn’t supposed to be breakable.
What had I been wearing? I wore the rape joke, then I became it.

This is the Rape Joke | d.a.s

After Lora Mathis’s poem “the Rape Joke

(via backshelfpoet)

(via fuckingrapeculture)


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